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I have this wood burning stove (pictured). It takes a 24" log and has an 8" flue. The stove is 36" from the wall. I am getting excessive creosote buildup inside the stove pipe before the chimney. Would a double walled stove pipe work better? The stove
Posted by Elite Deals - Chris M. on 24 October 2013 04:35 PM

Our Answer:

The primary issue with creosote buildup can be attributed to your relatively short vertical run. The diameter of the chimney flue the piping is venting into may also be playing a key factor here. Generally, it is best to have at least a 24 inch rise for an 8 inch diameter flue outlet. This allows the flue gases enough space to gain velocity so that they do not stagnate in the horizontal run of pipe. I am assuming that you are running your pipe into a wall thimble and do not have the option to lengthen the vertical rise. As such, switching to double walled stovepipe would be the only option to increase flue temperatures and decrease creosote buildup. What is the size of the chimney flue that the pipe is venting into? Is the chimney lined or unlined? Please advise at your convenience.

In Response to Question:

I have this wood burning stove (pictured). It takes a 24" log and has an 8" flue. The stove is 36" from the wall. I am getting excessive creosote buildup inside the stove pipe before the chimney. Would a double walled stove pipe work better? The stove pipe comes out the top of the stove 12 inches with a damper then a 90 degree bend then 38 inches of horizontal pipe with a slight grade to it up to the chimney wall adapter. Why is there so much build up in the 38" piece?

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